TDT1: Technology Portfolio for Richard Ruane

The Graphics Page

About this page

Can I Use This Image?

As many people are aware, the Web offers saavy searchers a wide variety of images to use on their sites. However, most images are copyrighted and using them without the proper license or permission is a violation of the author's and/or publisher's rights.Elsewhere, we cover the "copying guidelines" that give instructors limited ability to use an image for a limited duration of time. However, to make use of an image in pre-planned Web sites or presentations, it's best to get permission. When you use copyrighted images without the proper license you place the college at risk of a lawsuit.

What do you want to do with the image?

The type of license or permission you need is based on how you want to use the image. Use the following table as a guide.

I want to...Type of License or PermissionSample
Use an image as is
  • Any public domain image (any image listed as public domain or created before 1923)
  • Any Creative Commons licensed image
  • Any image you have permission to use.
An original image by Richard Ruane
Crop an image

Cropping may look like a fairly simple change, but it actually requires that you have permission to modify the image (not just use it).

  • Any public domain image (any image listed as public domain or created before 1923)
  • Any Creative Commons licensed image unless the image specifies "No Alterations."
  • Any image you have permission to modify.
A cropped copy of an original image by Richard Ruane
Adjust an image's color
  • Any public domain image (any image listed as public domain or created before 1923)
  • Any Creative Commons licensed image unless the image specifies "No Alterations."
  • Any image you have permission to modify.
A color-adjusted copy of an original photo by Richard Ruane, released under a Creative Commons license
Create a drawing based on a photo

Some artists insist that this creates a new image, but CW expects instructors to have a clear permission or license.

  • Any public domain image (any image listed as public domain or created before 1923)
  • Any Creative Commons licensed image unless the image specifies "No Alterations."
  • Any image you have permission to modify.
A color-adjusted copy of an original photo by Richard Ruane, released under a Creative Commons license

What about scanned documents?

A scan of a page from 'We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People' by Dan Gilmor

A scanned page from Gilmor's We the Media

Subject to the same exceptions for photocopies discussed elsewhere, scanned print materials require permission or license. Just because you have access to a print article or book does not mean that you can have the right to scan and upload the material for your students.

How do I cite an image?

It's important to note that almost all licenses or permission letters require that images be credited to their author, creator, or publishing group. Failing to do so, except under specific circumstances (such as using stock photos or clip art whose licenses permit such) is both a violation of copyright and Unless you have specific directions otherwise, you can use APA or MLA to cite the image:

Citation Reference
APA:

(Sandberg, 2009)

Sandberg, K. (2009). Heart anatomy [Drawing]. Retrieved from Flickr.

MLA:

(Sandberg)

Sandberg, K. Heart anatomy. 2009. Drawing. Flickr.com.

Note: The Heart Anatomy image is used under a Creative Commons license.